If you are curious, then ask.
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Reblogged from hoechlined  5,158 notes

“Unlike Stiles, I am actually innately shy and I am not as quick as he is to be confident in what he has to face. But we’re similiar in the way he feels about his friends and how he is loyal to them… and how he would do anything for them.” - Dylan O’Brien, Fashionisto Magazine

“Unlike Stiles, I am actually innately shy and I am not as quick as he is to be confident in what he has to face. But we’re similiar in the way he feels about his friends and how he is loyal to them… and how he would do anything for them.” - Dylan O’Brien, Fashionisto Magazine

Reblogged from jamus-13  28,808 notes
migizi:

campdracula5eva:

bebinn:

rhrealitycheck:

Scarlet Letters: Getting the History of Abortion and Contraception Right 

Abortion was not just legal—it was a safe, condoned, and practiced procedure in colonial America and common enough to appear in the legal and medical records of the period. Official abortion laws did not appear on the books in the United States until 1821, and abortion before quickening did not become illegal until the 1860s. If a woman living in New England in the 17th or 18th centuries wanted an abortion, no legal, social, or religious force would have stopped her.


Reminder that records of contraception and abortion exist all the way back to 1550 BCE in ancient Egypt!
This was a really fascinating read. Until the early 19th century, abortion was legal until “quickening,” or when the pregnant person first felt the baby kick - anywhere from 14 to 26 weeks into the pregnancy. Society only began to condemn it when people decided white, middle- to upperclass women weren’t having enough children soon enough in their lives, and when male doctors started taking over traditionally female health care fields, like midwifery.
Yep, shockingly enough, it’s never, ever been about the life of the fetus - only about misogyny, racism, and classism (ableism, too, though the article doesn’t discuss it).

The bolded is hella important.

Additionally, during the American Civil War, the same arguments that were made against abortion, are almost identical to the ones made currently.  Which is comforting, in a weird way. This period, however, was the one that charged up the subject the most and led to more legislation over it as many pills and ‘services’ cropped up to provide women abortion methods.
Read more here: http://coachlightpress.com/bygone/contraception.shtml

migizi:

campdracula5eva:

bebinn:

rhrealitycheck:

Scarlet Letters: Getting the History of Abortion and Contraception Right

Abortion was not just legal—it was a safe, condoned, and practiced procedure in colonial America and common enough to appear in the legal and medical records of the period. Official abortion laws did not appear on the books in the United States until 1821, and abortion before quickening did not become illegal until the 1860s. If a woman living in New England in the 17th or 18th centuries wanted an abortion, no legal, social, or religious force would have stopped her.

Reminder that records of contraception and abortion exist all the way back to 1550 BCE in ancient Egypt!

This was a really fascinating read. Until the early 19th century, abortion was legal until “quickening,” or when the pregnant person first felt the baby kick - anywhere from 14 to 26 weeks into the pregnancy. Society only began to condemn it when people decided white, middle- to upperclass women weren’t having enough children soon enough in their lives, and when male doctors started taking over traditionally female health care fields, like midwifery.

Yep, shockingly enough, it’s never, ever been about the life of the fetus - only about misogyny, racism, and classism (ableism, too, though the article doesn’t discuss it).

The bolded is hella important.

Additionally, during the American Civil War, the same arguments that were made against abortion, are almost identical to the ones made currently.  Which is comforting, in a weird way. This period, however, was the one that charged up the subject the most and led to more legislation over it as many pills and ‘services’ cropped up to provide women abortion methods.

Read more here: http://coachlightpress.com/bygone/contraception.shtml